Media centre

Current media releases:

A new species of spider that looks like a humbug and is just as sweet

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The new species of jumping spider looks like a Humbug and is just as sweet

The new species of Peacock Spider has “eyes” on his abdomen to show off as part of his mating “dance”

The new species of Wolf Spider looks like it’s wearing a fur stole around its shoulders

Past media releases:

Fun with Bush Blitz in the Gardens – 2 Dec 2018

 

 

Spider research assistant Eamon Amsters from the University of Queensland shows some budding arachnologists spiders discovered at the Bush Blitz
Budding scientists show no fear of a large Huntsman spider discovered during the Bush Blitz
Liam of the Canberra Herpetological Society and his Diamond python Phoenix share a moment with an eager young herpetologist
Dr Nimal Karunajeewa of the Melbourne Herbarium showing visitors moss discovered during the Bush Blitz

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bush Blitz expedition ventures to the nation’s capital

 

Media-media release-Bradhshaw-fish.docx

Could Cape York Peninsula be the spider capital of Australia?

All images and video are copyright to R. Whyte

Images available as high resolution, contacts on media release.

New species of funnel web - Mygalomorphae Barychelidae Idiomata sp.

New species of Brush-footed Trap-door spider – Mygalomorphae Barychelidae Idiomata sp.

New Species, of jumping spider discovered on Quinkan Bush Blitz by Robert Whyte

New species of jumping spider, Salticidae Jotus sp. nov. cf auripes

Jumping spiders can be 5-20mm long, and known for jumping up to 50 times their body length, they have 8 eyes and hunt during the day.

A new species of Gnaphosidae Ceryerda

A new species of Gnaphosidae Ceryerda, “swift spider”

Other species found do not have these “fuzzy” front legs, the male waves its plumed legs like a mosquito. These spiders are about 8-12mm long. See this spider in action

Ant eating spider - Zodariidae Habronestes

New species of ant eating spider,  Zodariidae Habronestes

Ant eating spiders mimic ants to be able to hunt them without being detected easily – the most dangerous form of camouflage (if you are an ant)

Trapdoor spider - Mygalomorphae Ctenizidae sp. nov. F

New species Saddle-legged Trapdoor, Conothele sp. Nov., family Ctenizidae.

Trapdoor spiders live in burrows where they wait for their prey in hiding. Some make doors for their burrows hence the name “trapdoor”.

Botanists confident they’ve discovered new plant species in pristine Victorian rainforest

Possible new species of violet © RBG Victoria
Possible new species of violet © RBG Victoria
Possible new species of violet © RBG Victoria
Possible new species of violet © RBG Victoria

 

Possible new species of violet © RBG Victoria
New species of violet © RBG Victoria

Media-media release-Li Cunxin dancing spider-11 July 2016

Peacock spider doing mating display-maratus eliasi- credit Michael Duncan
Peacock spider doing mating display-maratus eliasi- credit Michael Duncan
Maratus Ottoi -credit Michael Duncan
Maratus Ottoi -credit Michael Duncan
Maratus licunxin - credit Michael Duncan
Maratus licunxin – credit Michael Duncan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An unexpected find in the heart of the Gibson Desert – September 2015

Teachers find new species in far north Queensland – July 2015

New tarantula species discovered on Nt Bush Blitz – June 2015