Media centre

Current media releases:

Media-media release-Bradhshaw-fish.docx

Juvenile Angalarri grunter, photographed in an aquarium setup in a makeshift lab on the Bradshaw Field Training Area during the Bush Blitz. Photo M. Hammer (MAGNT)

Juvenile Angalarri grunter, photographed in an aquarium setup in a makeshift lab on the Bradshaw Field Training Area during the Bush Blitz. Photo M. Hammer (MAGNT)

Moment of discovery - the first juvenile Angalarri grunter recorded after checking a research net set on the Angalarri River floodplain. Photo M. Hammer (MAGNT)

Moment of discovery – the first juvenile Angalarri grunter recorded after checking a research net set on the Angalarri River floodplain. Photo M. Hammer (MAGNT)

Scientists and teachers worked together to set fyke nets on the Angalarri River floodplain. Photo J. Archibald (MAGNT)

Scientists and teachers worked together to set fyke nets on the Angalarri River floodplain. Photo J. Archibald (MAGNT)

Angalarri River headwaters, refuge habitat of Angalarri Grunter. Photo M. Hammer (MAGNT)

Angalarri River headwaters, refuge habitat of Angalarri Grunter. Photo M. Hammer (MAGNT)

 

Facts about ANGALARRI GRUNTER

Scientific name: Scortum neili

Identification: One of several types of grunter, colloquially known as bream, found in northern Australia. Reaches a size of around 50 centimetres, having a deep solid body and a small mouth. Body colour is slivery-blue, with hints of gold on the underside, and there are distinct black spots on the side of the body.

Unique patterning: Each fish is different in appearance with between 1-5 black spots on its sides, the number varying on each side of the fish and increasing with age.

One of Australia’s rarest fish: First discovered to science in the mid-1980s, given a scientific name in 1993. Adults known only from two sites in the Victoria River Catchment comprising deep spring fed pools lined with monsoon rainforest; one site on the Angalarri River on Bradshaw Field Training Area, the other on the East Baines River in Judbarra / Gregory National Park. The species is known to Aboriginal people by several language names, but is rarely caught due to its small mouth and diet.

Biology: Very little is known about the species. It is a herbivore being recorded to eat algae and fruits. Following the Bradshaw Bush Blitz we now know that juveniles can utilize floodplain and stream riffle habitat, at least in good years like the fantastic wet season of 2016/17. The size of fish captured using electrofishing and fyke nets was in the range of 10-12 centimetres, indicating a likely early wet season spawning period.

 

 

 

Past media releases:

Could Cape York Peninsula be the spider capital of Australia?

All images and video are copyright to R. Whyte

Images available as high resolution, contacts on media release.

New species of funnel web - Mygalomorphae Barychelidae Idiomata sp.

New species of Brush-footed Trap-door spider – Mygalomorphae Barychelidae Idiomata sp.

New Species, of jumping spider discovered on Quinkan Bush Blitz by Robert Whyte

New species of jumping spider, Salticidae Jotus sp. nov. cf auripes

Jumping spiders can be 5-20mm long, and known for jumping up to 50 times their body length, they have 8 eyes and hunt during the day.

A new species of Gnaphosidae Ceryerda

A new species of Gnaphosidae Ceryerda, “swift spider”

Other species found do not have these “fuzzy” front legs, the male waves its plumed legs like a mosquito. These spiders are about 8-12mm long. See this spider in action

Ant eating spider - Zodariidae Habronestes

New species of ant eating spider,  Zodariidae Habronestes

Ant eating spiders mimic ants to be able to hunt them without being detected easily – the most dangerous form of camouflage (if you are an ant)

Trapdoor spider - Mygalomorphae Ctenizidae sp. nov. F

New species Saddle-legged Trapdoor, Conothele sp. Nov., family Ctenizidae.

Trapdoor spiders live in burrows where they wait for their prey in hiding. Some make doors for their burrows hence the name “trapdoor”.

Botanists confident they’ve discovered new plant species in pristine Victorian rainforest

Possible new species of violet © RBG Victoria

Possible new species of violet © RBG Victoria

 

Possible new species of violet © RBG Victoria

New species of violet © RBG Victoria

Media-media release-Li Cunxin dancing spider-11 July 2016

Peacock spider doing mating display-maratus eliasi- credit Michael Duncan

Peacock spider doing mating display-maratus eliasi- credit Michael Duncan

Maratus Ottoi -credit Michael Duncan

Maratus Ottoi -credit Michael Duncan

Maratus licunxin - credit Michael Duncan

Maratus licunxin – credit Michael Duncan

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

An unexpected find in the heart of the Gibson Desert – September 2015

Teachers find new species in far north Queensland – July 2015

New tarantula species discovered on Nt Bush Blitz – June 2015